Summer Boating Safety: Staying calm, cool and hydrated

In many parts of the country, summer boating safety tips revolve around the increased number of boats and activity on the water. In Florida, we experience that issue between Thanksgiving and Easter during what we affectionately refer to as ‘season’. However, summer boating in Florida does come with its own set of seasonal challenges, which are either heat or weather-related. Let’s start with weather…

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Fine tuning your VHF radio know how

Fine tuning your VHF radio know how

The VHF radio is still the communication device of choice for a boater. It is the standard and, as it is universally used, it is arguably one of the most important piece of safety gear you can have aboard. But here are some questions many ask as they consider what to use and how to use it:

Fixed or Hand-held?

Today’s hand-held VHF radios are very versatile and convenient—plus they have the distinct advantage of not being dependent of the boat’s electrical system. In some emergencies, that power may not exist.

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Where and how to fuel up: Gauging your responsibility and options.

Where and how to fuel up: Gauging your responsibility and options.

As boaters in Southwest Florida, we need to keep in mind the challenges and hazards of fueling our vessels. Bigger boats often have quite large fuel tanks—much larger than cars—meaning where there’s more fuel, there’s more to cause problems if you’re not careful. Dock-based gas nozzles often pump fuel faster than those at automobile service stations. And, gasoline fumes are extremely flammable. In fact, most fires and/or explosions on boats happen during (or immediately after) fueling—so please take as much care as possible when at the pump.

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Boat Appétit: Life in a seafood lover’s paradise.

prawn salad

Boat Appétit: Life in a seafood lover’s paradise.

As boaters in Southwest Florida, one of the great activities the lifestyle affords us is enjoying a day on the water followed by a waterfront meal. And when it comes to the menu of options available in this part of the world, it is as appetizing as you’ll find—especially when you consider the opportunities to enjoy locally-caught seafood. This is something visitors from around the country come here craving, which should enhance your appreciation for your own backyard…along with your appetite. Popular and unique seafood choices are everywhere along Florida’s Gulf Coast. Here are some of our favorites:

Grouper

The domestic species caught off the coast of Florida is white and lean with a mild sweet flavor. Red Grouper meat is firm with a heavy flake and remains moist after cooking. It is one of the most popular choices in this region.

Oysters

Raw, cooked or smoked, oysters are another local favorite. Texture is a big part of their appeal. They are firm and slippery at the same time—or should be. The farther south you go and the warmer the water gets, the softer the oyster becomes. In contrast, an oyster from very cold water can be described as crisp or even crunchy. We enjoy and prefer the former here in Florida.

Pink Shrimp

Discovered in SW Florida just before 1950, this sweet, tasty variety indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico are considered by shrimp connoisseurs to be some of the sweetest in the United States. In fact, shrimp fishermen have considered it “pink gold” since the early 1950s. And, as anyone who has heard Bubba’s lengthy monologue—in the motion picture Forrest Gump—there is no limit to the ways you can enjoy what he calls the “fruit of the sea.”

Snapper

Red snapper is a firm-textured fish with moist, white flesh that is delicate and mild. It can be served broiled, baked, steamed, poached, fried or grilled. Red snapper responds well to most cooking methods. Baked whole red snapper stuffed with fresh herbs and seasoning is just one excellent recipe. Red snapper is excellent for grilling, and spring is the perfect time to fire up the barbecue. Lemon, butter and fresh chili peppers are great ways to season red snapper.

Stone Crab

This seasonal favorite is available fresh October 15 through May 15 in Florida. A sustainable and renewable food source, the claws are harvested from the crabs one at a time—leaving the crab with one intact upon releasing them. The claws then grow back within a year in adult crabs. They can be served hot with drawn butter or chilled—usually with a cold mustard sauce.

Mullet

One of the most underrated fish in the state, mullet have been a well-kept secret for as long as anyone can remember. This versatile, tasty fish can be prepared a multitude of ways and is, generally, a pleasant surprise to first-time tasters with its pleasant flavor and texture.

Your own catch

Many waterfront restaurants will cook your fresh caught fish for you. Local anglers know this well, as it is not uncommon for boats to tie up to a local seafood eatery, hand over their catch which is then cleaned and cooked to order—for a fee, of course. But we defy you to find a way to have seafood any fresher. So there you have it…a quick guide to enjoying life in a seafood lover’s paradise. This site has a map of many of the most popular waterfront dining spots for you to reference. Explore and enjoy!